Drinkable Sunscreen

SunDon’t ditch your spreadable SPF just yet

If that sounds like science fiction to you, you have good reason to be skeptical.

“How can you drink something that causes a vibrational wave in your skin?,” says Doris Day, MD, a dermatologist based in New York. “When you’re making a big claim like this, you need solid proof.”

And there doesn’t seem to be any. “There’s no evidence-based scientific data to support the product’s SPF 30 claims,” says dermatologist Michael Shapiro, MD, also based in New York. Plus, “Saying that their water is ‘imprinted’ with vibrational waves which ‘isolate’ the frequencies that protect against UV rays is dubious at best,” he says. He also notes that the company’s explanation of how the product works is too vague and too “out there” to allow the public to understand the science behind the claims.

We asked Johnson for the details on the company’s research, and well, there’s very little. No independent or clinical trials have been conducted on the product. Instead, “the UV Neutralizer was tested internally on roughly 50 people for extended stays in the sun before we launched it,” he says. As for what he says to dermatologists who don’t believe the hype, Johnson at least understands the skepticism, but urges them (and the public) to try it for themselves.

Courtesy, Details